Reines Lecture Series

The Reines Lecture Series honors Frederick Reines, UCI's Founding Dean of Physical Sciences and co-recipient of the 1995 Nobel Prize for discovering the neutrino.


Frederick Reines

Nobel Prize in Physics 1995
University of California, Irvine

In a so-called beta-decay of a nucleus, a neutron is converted to a proton amd at the same time an electron is produced. When studying e.g. the electron velocity, it was clear that the decay violated energy conservation and other decay properties. A proposal was made that in the decay an additional particle, called a neutrino, was created. In the beginning of the 1950s Frederick Reines used a water tank, located close to a nuclear reactor and discovered reactions showing the existence of the neutrino.

The Reines Lecture Series brings world renowned physicists and astronomers to UC Irvine to give a public lecture and a department colloquium. This celebration honors the rich history of the Department of Physics & Astronomy and brings together faculty, students, supporters, and the community at large.

Reines Lectures


Apr 07, 2020 With the invention of lasers, the intensity of a light wave was increased by orders of magnitude over what had been achieved with a light bulb or sunlight. This much higher intensity led to new phenomena being observed, such as violet light coming out when red light went into the material.
Mar 12, 2019 Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell will relate how pulsars (pulsating radio sources) were accidentally discovered (50 years ago!), discuss some instances where pulsars were 'nearly discovered' and reflect on what lessons can be drawn for today's telescopes and observing programs. 
Mar 06, 2018 The 2018 Reines Lecture was presented by Kip Thorne, winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for the detection of gravitational waves.  The discovery, part of the LIGO experiment, validated Albert Einstein’s longstanding prediction that during cataclysmic events the fabric of spacetime can be s
Mar 01, 2017 The 2017 Reines Lecture was delivered by Nobel Laureate Art McDonald on March 1, 2017. Professor Art McDonald was a co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics for discoveries he made as the Director of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) scientific collaboration.
Mar 09, 2016 The 2016 Reines Lecture was delivered by Nobel Laureate Steven Chu on March 9, 2016. Dr. Chu is co-recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics for his research in cooling and trapping of atoms with laser light.
Feb 24, 2015 The inaugural speaker of the Reines Lecture was Dr. Frank A. Wilczek, recipient of the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics for work he did as a graduate student at Princeton University when he was only 21 years old.