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Check out the School of Physical Sciences eNewsletter "Physical Matters."
UC Irvine researchers played a key part in findings released this week about the rate at which the universe expanded after the Big Bang and continues...
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News

Earth's climate is changing, and so is its hydrologic cycle. Recent decades have witnessed rising rates of global precipitation, evaporation, and...
In the past two decades, we’ve seen dramatic images of ice shelves and the floating tongues of glaciers crumble into the ocean.
It's called calving, and it occurs when enormous chunks of ice burst free from glaciers or floating ice shelves and drop into the sea with an...
The late Carl Sagan got lots of praise for his brilliance in explaining science to the masses, especially on his PBS TV series Cosmos back in the...
Antarctica's ice shelves are losing it. Conventional wisdom holds that ice shelves—the seaward extension of glaciers on land—lose most of their mass...
Ocean waters melting the undersides of Antarctic ice shelves, not icebergs calving into the sea, are responsible for most of the continent’s ice loss...
In an article in the journal Science this week, University of California-Irvine professor of engineering James Famiglietti and NASA hydrologist...
It was another successful year for the Physical Sciences Undergraduate Mentoring (PSUM) program. Mentors launched students into graduate schools such...
Far, far away, at the Milky Way’s outer skirts, is a galaxy home to just 1,000 stars, all held together with dark matter, our galactic glue.
The least massive galaxy in the known universe has been measured by UC Irvine scientists, clocking in at just 1,000 or so stars with a bit of dark...